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Crisis De-Escalation

Are you ready when a crisis occurs?
Do you know how to help a student in crisis?
Can you keep yourself and others safe during a crisis?
Join our experts for an informative and entertaining 90-minute training on these issues.
You will learn:
  • The importance of establishing rapport, common threats to rapport building, clearly establishing boundaries, and special considerations when working with a range of populations.
  • How to mitigate bias and develop cultural competency when engaging in crisis de-escalation.
  • Practical techniques to apply including motivational interviewing, counseling skills, and change theory.
  • The importance of documentation, referral, and follow up.
A man in jeans and a gray hoodie, sitting on stairs and hunched over.

Please use your SCU email address.

Course Outline

This program will review topics related to establishing rapport and mitigating bias, and will review practical techniques for crisis de-escalation.

Please proceed through the videos listed to the left. If you close the window, you will be able to pick up where you left off when you return.

Please watch all videos before you continue.

 
Pre-Test
1. When de-escalating a crisis, the most important consideration always needs to be
2. Everyone escalates through the same series of biological changes during a crisis event (increased blood pressure, heartrate, and adrenaline), so application of intervention techniques should be the consistent for each crisis.
3. When talking with someone in crisis
4. Many people talk about suicide or committing suicide, but unless they have access to weapons, you should always refer them directly to the counseling center. Don’t reach beyond your expertise.
5. The five techniques of motivational interviewing are
6. Crisis de-escalation is both art and science. The science is understanding the biological changes that occur when someone is escalating. The art is the dynamic choosing of intervention techniques based on the person who is escalating.
7. Follow up steps after a crisis include
8. A bridge to connection refers to looking for commonalities between you and the person in crisis to close the gap and work more effectively together to find a resolution.
9. Microaggressions
10. Providing culturally competent interventions means considering the unique qualities of historically marginalized populations, avoiding microaggressions, and being aware that the impact of your role or position may escalate the situation regardless of your intent.
Please answer all of the questions.
 
 
Thank you for completing Culturally Competent Crisis De-Escalation training.
If you have questions or have not received your certificate, email info@interactt.org
Thank you for completing Culturally Competent Crisis De-Escalation training.
Please enter you name here. You will receive a certificate of completion within two business days.
If you have questions or do not receive your certificate, email info@interactt.org

Thank you!

Other Resources:
Videos referenced:
Post-Test
1. Many people talk about suicide or committing suicide, but unless they have access to weapons, you should always refer them directly to the counseling center. Don’t reach beyond your expertise.
2. Follow up steps after a crisis include
3. When de-escalating a crisis, the most important consideration always needs to be
4. Everyone escalates through the same series of biological changes during a crisis event (increased blood pressure, heartrate, and adrenaline), so application of intervention techniques should be the consistent for each crisis.
5. Microaggressions
6. Providing culturally competent interventions means considering the unique qualities of historically marginalized populations, avoiding microaggressions, and being aware that the impact of your role or position may escalate the situation regardless of your intent.
7. The five techniques of motivational interviewing are
8. A bridge to connection refers to looking for commonalities between you and the person in crisis to close the gap and work more effectively together to find a resolution.
9. Crisis de-escalation is both art and science. The science is understanding the biological changes that occur when someone is escalating. The art is the dynamic choosing of intervention techniques based on the person who is escalating.
10. When talking with someone in crisis
Please answer all of the questions.
 
You must score 80% or better to complete the course.
Please review the materials and re-take the test.
 
Our Instructors
Dr. Brian Van Brunt
Brian Van Brunt, EdD

Lead Consultant, Looking Glass Consulting and Design | Content Expert, InterACTT

Assistant Deputy Director of Training, Secure Community Network

brianvanbrunt.com | InterACTT.org

Brian is the assistant deputy director for training at Secure Community Network and the lead content expert at InterACTT. Formerly a partner with TNG and the president of the National Association for Behavioral Intervention and Threat Assessment (NABITA), Brian has provided consulting services to schools, colleges, and universities across the country and abroad on a wide variety of topics related to student mental health, counseling, campus violence, and behavioral intervention.

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